HAPCOA News

 

Sep
1

National Faith and Blue Weekend: October 9-11, 2020

ANNOUNCING NATIONAL FAITH AND BLUE WEEKEND:
A Public-Private Collaborative Effort to Build Bridges and Break Biases
Law Enforcement Unites with Faith Community for a Nationwide Weekend of Resolution and Reconciliation

[Washington, DC] – The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) along with other national law enforcement groups, the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) and MovementForward, Inc.’s One Congregation One Precinct (OneCOP) iniatiive are jointly organizing the most consolidated police-community engagement project in recent history - National Faith and Blue Weekend (NFBW) with FirstNet, Built with AT&T  as its presenting sponsor. The mission of NFBW is to facilitate safer, stronger and more unified communities by connecting law enforcement officers and residents through local houses of worship.

“Finding common ground and ensuring justice for all starts with collaborative and respectful communication and the National Faith and Blue Weekend is evidence of leadership by example,” said Jason Porter, senior vice president, FirstNet Program at AT&T. “Through its mission focused and highly diverse group of faith-based and policing organization leaders, this initiative is laser focused on facilitating positive and actionable community relations between citizens and law enforcement across our Nation. As America’s public safety partner, it’s our honor to support this grassroots effort to strengthen police-community relations in neighborhoods across the country.”

As the nation continues to grapple with recent discord between law enforcement and some of the communities they serve, this weekend will serve as NFBW’s first installation to address an urgent yet longstanding need for authentic collaboration between law enformcent and citizens.

HAPCOA’s mission is to “empower the future of law enforcement” by assisting law enforcement, criminal justice and community organizations nationwide.  Our membership of command staff officers, at the municipal, county, state, university, school and federal levels supports NFBW as it is encourages the faith-based relationship that we have endorsed for over 45 years!

Collaborations between law enforcement and local groups – especially faith-based organizations – are invaluable force-multipliers for creating safer and more engaged communities. NFBW will positively impact Americans by directly engaging community influencers, residents and law enforcement professionals in every state across the U.S. 

“Our pathway to progress around policing as a nation is a collaborative one that focuses on our commonalities rather than our differences,” says Reverend Markel Hutchins, National Lead Organizer, One Congregation One Precinct initiative (OneCOP) and President & CEO, MovementForward, Inc. “Because sixty million Americans attend weekly gatherings at more than 350,000 houses of worship nationwide, nothing rivals the depth and breadth of influence presented by houses of worship who are unique and powerful gateways to the heart of communities in which they have a mutual interest in achieving effective police-community engagement.”

NFBW is slated for October 9 – 11, 2020 with planned activities such as  community dialogues, service projects and other interactive experiences to help foster on-going, authentic and mutual community-law enforcement trust.

NFBW is an unprecedented national law enforcement-community engagement project involving nearly every major national law enforcement group in the United States of America along with the three entities in the federal government that deal most directly with policing. On April 27, 2020, led by Director Keith and Reverend Hutchins, the heads of each of the following organizations participated in the initial meeting:

  • Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, United States Department of Justice
  • Office of Justice Programs, United States Department of Justice
  • Bureau of Justice Assistance, United States Department of Justice
  • Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association
  • Fraternal Order of Police
  • Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police
  • International Brotherhood of Police Officers
  • International Conference of Police Chaplains
  • Major County Sheriffs of America
  • National Asian Peace Officers Association
  • National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys
  • National Association of Police Organizations
  • National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives
  • National Black Police Association
  • National District Attorney’s Association
  • National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund
  • National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives
  • National Narcotics Officers’ Associations’ Coalition
  • National Police Foundation
  • National Sheriffs’ Association
  • Police Executive Research Forum

Initial meeting participants had no idea that the unfortunate death of George Floyd in Minneapolis nearly three weeks later would accelerate and reiterate the need for this so sorely needed, change effort.

For more information about National Faith and Blue Weekend, visit www.faithandblue.org.

 

ABOUT HAPCOA:  The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) is a non-profit membership organization established in 1973. It is the oldest and largest association in the U.S. of Hispanic American command officers from law enforcement and criminal justice agencies at the municipal, county, state, university, school and federal levels.  

For more information, membership and donations please visit:  www.hapcoa.org

ABOUT FIRSTNET BUILT WITH AT&T

FirstNet is built with AT&T in a public-private partnership with the FirstNet Authority – an independent federal government agency. We continue to deliver on the vision of the first responder community and Congress. With dedicated, advanced services built to mission-critical standards interoperating across agencies and jurisdictions, custom apps and devices built for law enforcement, fire and EMS, it’s clear FirstNet stands above commercial offerings. And more than 12,000 public safety agencies and organizations – accounting for over 1.3 million connections – would agree.

FirstNet® and the FirstNet logo are registered trademarks and service marks of the First Responder Network Authority. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

 
 
Aug
25

Blossoms and Bling!

Our sweet Brooke Elizabeth loved wearing and sharing beautiful blossoms and bling!

Now YOU can have the very special opportunity to wear a GORGEOUS, intricately designed and very unique sterling silver Brooke’s Blossoms ring adorned with a sparkling pink center for FREE! How you ask????

Thanks to our special partnership with compassionate friends at Variety Television Network, this ring can be yours when you become a member of the online commerce club. It gets better too... every membership of the commerce club also gives 20% of the proceeds to our foundation as well as proceeds of other future items you buy too! Stay tuned too because a COMPLETE line is being made!

Isn’t that amazing???

Brooke loved to say thank you... and what a beautiful way to thank YOU for your support!!!

The inside of the ring even has engraved replicas of her own signature curly “B”

Remember too, if you don’t want the free ring you can still sign up for the $15 a month membership and get discounted items to support our foundation later too.

So don’t delay... please check out the link below with details on how you can get your free ring (or even 2 free rings) with this unique way to display your support for Brooke’s Blossoming Hope for Childhood Cancer Foundation and the children we serve worldwide!

Get your free Brooke's Blossom Bling Ring by clicking here!

 
 
Aug
17

A Menthol Cigarette Ban to Create New Opportunities for Gang and Organized Crime

A WRITTEN STATEMENT:
Prepared by the
National Board of Directors of the
Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

A Menthol Cigarette Ban to Create New Opportunities for Gang and Organized Crime

(Washington, DC) The UK, EU, Canada, several other countries and several US states have banned the sale of menthol cigarettes. Under the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned flavored in cigarettes, citing their appeal to youth and young adults. Although initially exempt, the FDA has recently announced its intention to also ban menthol in cigarettes in the hopes that this ban will lower the number of smokers.

California and several other states are presently considering a statewide ban on the sale of menthol cigarettes.

The unintended consequence of this legislative action, to ban the sale of menthol cigarettes, is the creation of a black market for these products. Violent street gangs already make millions of dollars in dealing illegal cigarettes alongside drugs and guns. Adding banned menthol cigarettes to their inventories will be an easy task as these items are readily available in neighboring states.

As such, organized criminal elements that will purchase or steal banned menthol cigarettes from neighboring states or communities and then re-sell them, as contraband will circumvent the health intension of the ban, to include curbing youth smokers.

Massachusetts has recently became the first state in the country to ban menthol cigarettes and the cross-border trafficking began immediately. Despite the statewide ban, the menthol cigarettes are being sold, trafficking related violence continues and the states are losing the tax revenue.

In 2018, the City of San Francisco banned menthol cigarettes and evidence of related violence began immediately. Within six months armed robberies of smoke shops and convenience stores in nearby Fresco spiked.

Despite the intended health concerns, the creation of a new black market opportunity will have negative consequences within our communities. With plans underway to sharply reduce police agency funding the ability of our local and state law enforcement agencies to effectively police this issue will be negated.

HAPCOA recommends that government bodies considering banning menthol cigarettes please consult with your municipal, county and state law enforcement leaders for information of how this action will affect your community policing efforts. Failure to effectively fund the policing efforts required to support this health related action might place our police officers and our communities in danger.

About HAPCOA: The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) is a non-profit membership organization established in 1973. It is the oldest and largest association in the U.S. of Hispanic American command officers from law enforcement and criminal justice agencies at the municipal, county, state, university, and federal levels.

As a non-partisan, 501(c) 3 non-profit organization, HAPCOA does not, and cannot, endorse or support candidates for political office.

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association
PO Box 29626
Washington, DC 20017
www.hapcoa.org

 
 
Jul
17

HAPCOA Member Presents LEARN Lecture

On July 16, 2020, Mr. Paul J. Chapa who serves as the Assistant Vice President of Enterprise Risk Management and Safety and Chief of Police at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas presented to the Law Enforcement Area Resource Network (LEARN) from the Boston Massachusetts area. The topic of Chief Chapa’s presentation was “Community Engagement Through 21st Century Policing.”

Chief Chapa shared the many community engagement initiatives his team has sponsored to include Pan Dulce with Police, Cop Corn, Coffee with a Cop and many more. Chief Chapa commented “The 21st Century Policing Six Pillars are measures that all police agencies should adopt, it’s what our communities demand now more than ever.” The six pillars are identified as 1.) Building Trust and Legitimacy 2.) Policy and Oversight 3.) Technology and Social Media 4.) Community Policing and Crime Reduction 5.) Officer Training and Education and 6.) Officer Safety and Wellness.

During the presentation Chief Chapa shared “As many police agencies are seeking a path forward in our current social pandemic against the police, the six pillars have identified a strong foundation for us to adopt.” On December 18, 2014, President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order appointing an 11-member task force on 21st century policing to respond to a number of serious incidents between law enforcement and the communities they serve and protect. The President wanted a quick but thorough response that would begin the process of healing and restore community trust.

Other police agencies that participated in the zoom presentation included Harvard University Police Department, Brown University Police Department, Northeastern University Police Department, MIT Police Department, and many more. Special thanks to Sergeant Jacobo Negron of Harvard University Police Department for coordinating the presentation.

The Trinity University Police Department has achieved Recognition status from the Texas Police Chief's Association and Accreditation from the International Association of Police Administrators. Both accreditations are voluntary processes where police agencies prove their compliance with over 200 Law Enforcement Best Practices. These Best Practices were carefully developed by law enforcement professionals to assist agencies in the efficient and effective delivery of service, the reduction of risk and the protection of individual's rights.

Chief Chapa served as the National President of the Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) in 2012-2013.

 
 
Jul
15

HAPCOA Responses to Negative Social Media Posts

A Written Statement:
Prepared by the
National Board of Directors of the
Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

Respecting the Families of two McAllen Police Officers Killed in the Line of Duty

(Washington, DC) This past Saturday, July 11, 2020, two officers of the City of McAllen, TX, Police Department were killed in the line of duty while responding to a complaint of domestic violence.

The suspect, without warning, shot both brave officers as they approached the door of the home. As Police Chief Victor Rodriguez said during a press conference, “ The officers never had a chance to suspect a deadly assault on them, much less death, at that moment in time”. The Police Officers were Ismael Chavez, 39 and Edelmiro Garza, Jr., 45. Garza had been with the department close to nine years while Chavez had been on the force for about two and a half years.

Subsequently, members of the families, posted on social media, their thoughts and feelings with grieving family, friends, fellow officers and the general public. By and large many of the responses were supportive and empathetic. Not expected were negative postings against the Police and hurtful comments directed to the families in mourning.

These two, Police Officers, were dedicated public servants and true guardians of a community that truly respected them for their service and bravery under duress.

The HAPCOA Board of Directors asks that all its members, supporting law enforcement associations, and supporting members of the Hispanic community, please send, in care of Chief Victor Rodriguez, McAllen Police Department, 1601 N. Bicentennial Blvd, McAllen, TX 78501, letters of support and condolence. We must show our support to the families of our fallen officers and also support the proud members of the McAllen Police Department.

McAllen, TX is located in southern Texas along the US-Mexico border.

About HAPCOA: The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) is a non-profit membership organization established in 1973. It is the oldest and largest association in the U.S. of Hispanic American command officers from law enforcement and criminal justice agencies at the municipal, school, county, state, university, and federal levels.

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association
PO Box 29626
Washington, DC 20017
www.hapcoa.org

 
 
Jun
16

President Trump Signs Executive Order on Safe Policing for Safe Communities

(Washington, DC) On June 16, 2020, President Trump signed an Executive Order to foster closer ties between law enforcement and the communities that we protect and serve.

Under the Order, the Attorney General will allocate certain grant funding to only those law enforcement agencies that meet high standards, including use-of-force and de-escalation protocols.

The Order also provides incentives for law enforcement agencies to use a nationwide database to track terminations, criminal convictions, and civil judgments against law enforcement officers for excessive use-of-force.

The Administration will prioritize training and other programs for police and social workers responding to incidents involving the mentally ill, addicted, and homeless.

In addition, President Trump is directing his Administration to develop and prepare new legislation before Congress to further the policies of the Executive Order and to build upon community engagement.

HAPCOA, in conversation, with Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Special Assistant to the President and Director of Hispanic Engagement, White House Office of Public Liaison, has been invited to establish an ongoing relationship and dialogue with the Administration to voice our concerns and to share our focus with respect to diversity in law enforcement, specialized training, mentoring and safeguarding & building public trust.

 
 
Jun
6

Our Response to the Tragic Loss of the Public’s Trust in Policing

A Written Statement:

Prepared by the
National Board of Directors of the
Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

Our Response to the Tragic Loss of the Public’s Trust in Policing

(Washington, DC) The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) denounces and admonishes the four Minneapolis police officers involved in the senseless and tragic murder of George Floyd. The officers acted poorly by not heeding to the pleas made by Mr. Floyd. The officers’ callous, insensitive, and heartless demeanor does NOT represent the values and precepts that the thousands of men and women in law enforcement demonstrate as they carry out their sworn duties. The noted actions of these four officers violated George Floyd's human rights; this contradicts the police officers' oath to protect and save human life.

HAPCOA recognizes that when the actions of a few officers are no longer within the realm of acceptable and accredited policing norms, and when the actions of a few, may be alleged as criminal; then it is our sworn duty and responsibility, as command officers, to step forward and appropriately remove (suspend, fire or charge) the offending officers.

HAPCOA accepts that as an association of Hispanic command officers, we must take a profound leadership role when the issue of losing public TRUST invades the diverse communities that we serve and protect. In many cases, the communities that we patrol are where we grew up, where we went to school, and where our extended families may still live and work today.

HAPCOA embraces the value of public TRUST by actively building rapport and demonstrating confidence in our law enforcement ability to perform our sworn duty without disparate treatment found within some of our communities. Through active ENGAGEMENT, we are open to continued dialogue with our local community, schools, houses of worship, and businesses. We are ACCOUNTABLE to self, our agencies, and the local community at large. And we must have RESPECT for human life, regardless of one's socioeconomic status.

About HAPCOA: The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) is a non-profit membership organization established in 1973. It is the oldest and largest association in the U.S. of Hispanic American command officers from law enforcement and criminal justice agencies at the municipal, county, state, university, and federal levels.

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association
PO Box 29626
Washington, DC 20017

Download the statement here

 
 
May
15

Proclamation on Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2020

On Peace Officers Memorial Day and during Police Week, we commend the brave men and women of our law enforcement community for continually summoning the courage to fulfill their solemn oath to protect and serve.  We also pause to remember all those who have lost their lives and who have suffered permanent disabilities defending their communities and the rule of law, including the heroes we have lost this year to the coronavirus.

Throughout our Nation’s history, law enforcement officials have never wavered in the face of crisis or tragedy.  During uncertain times, law enforcement officers bravely face challenges and continue to protect the American people.  They steadfastly ensure the safety of our communities, providing a much needed sense of security for our citizens, and our country is extremely grateful for their efforts.

My Administration remains committed to ensuring our Nation’s Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement officers have the resources and support they need to perform their duties safely and effectively.  Last October, I was proud to sign an Executive Order to establish the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice — the first commission on law enforcement in half a century.  This Commission identifies ways to reduce crime while simultaneously bringing law enforcement officers and the communities they serve closer together.  We have also worked to expand lifesaving programs like the National Blue Alert Network.  Thirty-five States have enacted Blue Alert plans, which provide early warnings to law enforcement agencies, the media, and the public by transmitting Blue Alerts to cell phones, television stations, and other devices.  These alerts disseminate information on suspects who pose an imminent and credible threat to the safety of our officers, and this network demonstrates how we can work together to provide proactive programs, innovative resources, and cutting-edge technology to support and advance our law enforcement personnel.

We must continue working toward a time when all people respect and understand the important work that law enforcement officers do.  Unfortunately, our law enforcement officers do not always receive the respect they deserve.  These brave men and women must operate in an environment where their moral and legal authority is constantly being scrutinized, and they undertake the critical yet difficult task of addressing the actions of those affected by addiction, homelessness, and mental illness.  Their ability to work well in the face of these and other challenges is extraordinary, and we have incredible appreciation for their public service and selflessness.

On behalf of our grateful Nation, we proudly recognize the more than 900,000 sworn members of law enforcement for their resolve and dedication in the face of dangerous uncertainty.  The thoughts and prayers of our Nation are with them and their families, and we will always owe them our appreciation and support.

By a joint resolution approved October 1, 1962, as amended (Public Law 87-726, 76 Stat. 676), and by section 1 of Public Law 105-225 (36 U.S.C. 136-137), the President has been authorized and requested to designate May 15 of each year as “Peace Officers Memorial Day” and the week in which it falls as “Police Week.”

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 15, 2020, as Peace Officers Memorial Day and May 10 through May 16, 2020, as Police Week.  In honor of our hardworking law enforcement officers, Melania and I will light the White House in blue on May 15, 2020.  I call upon all Americans to observe Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.  I also call on the Governors of the States and Territories and officials of other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on Peace Officers Memorial Day.  I further encourage all Americans to display the flag from their homes and businesses on that day.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth.

DONALD J. TRUMP
The White House

- - - - - - - - - - 

On Friday, May 15, 2020, HAPCOA Executive Director Anthony Chapa was invited to participate in the Attorney General’s “Police Week Briefing with America’s Law Enforcement”.  Due to COVID-19 this meeting was held via a conference call.

Invited to dial into this call were over one-thousand senior executives in policing, police survivors and national law enforcement organizations to include HAPCOA.

Present and presenting during this briefing included:  Attorney General William P. Barr; Acting Secretary Department of Homeland Security Chad F. Wolf; and Director, White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, James “Jim” Carroll.

 
 
May
4

HAPCOA's statement to the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice

A WRITTEN STATEMENT
Submitted to the
Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice
On behalf of the
Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

The Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) is a non-profit membership organization established in 1973, and is the oldest and largest association in the U.S. of Hispanic American command officers from law enforcement and criminal justice agencies at the municipal, county, state, university and federal levels.

HAPCOA’s mission is to “empower the future of law enforcement” by assisting law enforcement, criminal justice and community organizations nationwide in their efforts to recruit, train and promote qualified Hispanic American men and women committed to a career in the criminal justice arena and to communities in which they serve and protect.

As such, when Attorney General William Barr formed the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, on January 21, 2020, HAPCOA was pleased to see that of the several issues noted as worthy of review and concern included the question:  “How can we improve officer recruitment, training, and retention?”

The mission of HAPCOA is clearly in support of this concern, but our focus goes even deeper into “ways to make American Law Enforcement the most trusted and effective guardians of our communities” as stated by Attorney General Barr.

HAPCOA reports that recruitment of law enforcement officers must include a directed effort at recruiting a diverse workforce.  Quantitative reporting confirms that to hire a diverse workforce the number of individuals ‘recruited’ must exceed the number of non-minority candidates.  Without active recruitment in targeted areas the number of qualified Hispanic candidates will not increase.  But HAPCOA goes to the next level and focuses on the recruitment of experienced Hispanic law enforcement officers into advanced law enforcement training programs, such as forensics, investigations, and leadership, to help improve upon their qualifications to promote into senior leadership roles and attain executive level managerial positions.

HAPCOA reports that training programs from law enforcement academies to in-service training programs are key to keeping officers informed, prepared, technically advanced and safe.  But HAPCOA sees training as an opportunity to focus on topics that are of concern to the diverse communities that we serve and protect.  Developing law enforcement training programs that enhance an officer’s ability to understand community relations, issues concerning cultural bias and language barriers serve as an aide to help navigate the concerns of the community at large while taking into consideration the officers ability to meet the needs of the diverse community that they serve.  Enhanced training may include language courses, cultural awareness courses, and roundtable discussions with community leaders and role-playing opportunities that will enhance officer safety, facilitate trust and increase community involvement and cooperation.

HAPCOA is extremely concerned about the retention of law enforcement officers as well.  As law enforcement departments find that they must freeze hiring or furlough officers, the last hired (members of your diversified workforce) will be the first to go.  While this is a financial concern of city managers, county officials, university presidents, and Governors, it is the diverse communities that will be adversely impacted.  

HAPCOA hopes that the US Congress will address these emerging issues by supporting law enforcement at its local levels with funding and support to keep its law enforcement officers on the beat, communicating with its communities and providing necessary services during this pandemic.

HAPCOA believes that the future of law enforcement is one where our law enforcement officers (and the leadership of these agencies) are reflective of the communities that they serve.  Officers who are well-trained and knowledgeable of their communities needs, issues and problems, are more apt to be successful as they are vested in the community that they serve.  This must also include Hispanic officers who are willing to take leadership roles and effectively command law enforcement functions and responsibilities within their communities.  Today our most diverse communities include our nation’s largest cities, and even our smallest rural communities.  The latest US Census will report that we have become a more diverse nation and that this expansion is not just in a few States but also within a majority of our American States.  

The events which transpired in Ferguson and cities throughout the United States in 2014 were indicators of a the deep-seated resentment among community members who believe their concerns were not being viewed as valid, worthy of attention, or consideration. Law enforcement officers, imbedded as public servants, are entrusted to “maintain the peace” while fostering a safe environment where businesses and neighborhoods thrive. Special attention must be given to understanding the cultural composition of individual communities. Embracing differences and cultivating sameness encourages dialogue with members and may open avenues for change. More than ever, it is crucial to pursue solutions to the issues that are created when members of law enforcement and representatives of our criminal justice system are not reflective of the diverse populations they serve. (HAPCOA Statement regarding Ferguson, MO; posted: December 5, 2014)

HAPCOA has been dedicated to this cause for over 46 years by providing a yearly training symposium that focuses on recruitment, leadership training, mentorship, promotions and topical courses that address the Attorney General’s focus on how to make law enforcement ‘trusted and effective guardians’ of the communities that they protect and serve.

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association
PO Box 29626
Washington, DC 20017
www.hapcoa.org

Prepared and submitted on behalf of HAPCOA by:

Anthony Chapa
Executive Director
achapa@hapcoa.org

Chief Teresa Ramon
National President

Richard Rosa  
Immediate Past President

Chief Don Tijerina
National Vice President

Mary Ruiz
National Secretary

 
 
May
4

HAPCOA Supports the Annual Candlelight Vigil

HAPCOA has supported the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) Annual Candlelight Vigil by attending the annual event, by being selected to read off the names of the fallen and by donations to the Memorial Fund.

This year due to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic the annual event, highlighted by the 32nd Annual Candlelight Vigil, has been canceled.  The NLEOMF reports that the pandemic will NOT deter them from honoring the fallen.  

On Wednesday, May 13, at 8 pm (EDT) the NLEOMF plans to move forward in solidarity with a virtual Candlelight Vigil, including the reading of names of officers who made the ultimate sacrifice.  This year the event will honor 307 fallen officers whose names will be engraved onto the Memorial.

To be apart of this years virtual event please visit LawMemorial.org to watch a broadcast of this important and moving ceremony.  

If you wish to support the Memorial Fund please visit the website (LawMemorial.org) or mail your donations to National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, PO Box 97072, Washington, DC 20090-7072.  The NLEOMF is a 501©(3) charity organization and your gifts are tax-deductible.